courtshelpmorgan geyserschizophreniaslender manslenderman

Support for Morgan

Chrisa Hickey6 comments1493 views
Help us move Morgan Geyser's case to juvenile court.
Help us move Morgan Geyser’s case to juvenile court.

Many of you may have heard about an incident that happened in Wisconsin regarding two girls stabbing a third girl in the woods, due to a fear of a fictional character called “Slender Man”.
What you may not know is that one of the children being prosecuted for this crime is Morgan Geyser, a 12-year old girl diagnosed with childhood onset schizophrenia.
Last Friday, the judge presiding over this case determined that this child will be prosecuted for first degree attempted homicide in adult court.  As you can imagine, her family and lawyer don’t believe a child with a brain disorder should be prosecuted as an adult.
There will be a hearing in June before this judge to argue moving the case to juvenile court.  Her family feels that letters addressed to the court from other parents of children with mental illnesses – particularly schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder – that discuss the challenges and issues our children endure with these illnesses, may help convince the judge that the case belongs in juvenile court.
If you would like to write a letter on Morgan’s behalf, please address your letter to The Honorable Judge Michael O. Boren, the judge in this case.
Please be courteous, tell your story, and please try to keep your letter to two typed pages or less.
Morgan’s lawyer has advised her parents to collect the letters, so when your letter is complete, please mail it to:
Support for Morgan Geyser
PO Box 865
Waukesha, WI 53187-0865

 

If you have any questions, please email me and I  will get back to you as soon as possible.  Thank you.

6 Comments

  1. Would it potentially be helpful for someone with a mental illness to send a letter? I experienced a psychotic break when I was Morgan's age, which included delusions/hallucinations that commanded me to hurt others and myself; however, I was fortunate enough to receive intensive treatment before tragedy could strike. As a young adult, I am now healthy, have a good network of friends, am a successful student, and work with children. If I had been permanently judged by who my illness made me be when I was in middle school, though, this would have never been possible. This story breaks my heart, and I want to help.

  2. On it. I also have friends with similar backgrounds that I will reach out to have write letters. This is my start, after which I will talk about the importance/impact of treatment:

    "My name is XXX XXXXXXX. At present, I am an honors student at XXXXX College, am working with at-risk youth, and an otherwise healthy, self-sufficient individual with a supportive network of friends and advisers. When I was Morgan Geyser’s age, however, I was a patient in a secure psychiatric treatment center receiving intensive intervention for a diagnosis of Bipolar I Disorder, Severe, with Psychotic Features. At the time I was admitted, I was experiencing hallucinations that demanded I hurt myself and my peers, and delusions that led me to believe that the consequences of not complying with these demands would include supernatural beings coming to harm my family. While I was actively trying to resist these phantoms, I was rapidly losing ground. Had I not been hospitalized when I was, I firmly believe that I would have found myself in a similar situation to Morgan’s."

    I hope it helps. Everything about this is indefensible; t's stores like these that make me not want to live in this society. Thanks for your efforts. Truly. It's been so hard to find a symapethtic spot for Morgan on the web/in the media.

  3. This is what I wrote. If possible, I would appreciate it if you could just give me the O.K before I send it off. (And I have multiple friends who are writing, as well).

    To The Honorable Judge Michael O. Boren;

    My name is XXX XXXXXXX. At present, I am an honors student at XXXXXX XXXXXXX, work with at-risk youth, and am an otherwise healthy, self-sufficient individual with a supportive network of friends and advisers. When I was Morgan Geyser’s age, however, I was a patient in a secure psychiatric treatment center receiving intensive intervention for a diagnosis of Bipolar I Disorder, Severe, with Psychotic Features. At the time I was admitted, I was experiencing hallucinations that demanded I hurt myself and my peers, and delusions that led me to believe that the consequences of not complying with these demands would include supernatural beings coming to harm my family. While I was actively trying to resist these phantoms, I was rapidly losing ground. Had I not been hospitalized when I was, I firmly believe that I would have found myself facing a similar crisis as Morgan’s.

    Fortunately, I received the care that I needed before tragedy could strike my family, friends and community. The recovery process that followed was lengthy and required a combination of inpatient care, therapy, medication and outpatient support services, and I will always have to carefully manage my illness; but it has ultimately enabled me to live a full life. Many families, however, face a much different outcome because stigma, lack of education and funding constraints result in significant delays in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset mental illness. In other words, it is not that treatment is ineffective, but that most youth never have the opportunity to benefit from it. Based upon what we have learned about Morgan Geyser’s life, this seems to be what has happened to her. Without access to proper information about childhood mental health conditions, multiple red flags and chances to intervene were missed by the professionals in her life.

    This, however, does not have to be the totality of her future. By moving the case to juvenile court, you have the opportunity to ensure that she receives the treatment that she needs to no longer be a danger to herself and others, and still allow for the chance that she will one day be able to live a healthy, productive life. While it can be easy to condemn her based upon her current actions and condition, I ask that you consider this alternate option. If the possibilities for my adulthood had been judged based upon the illness of my adolescence, I would have never had access to the opportunities that I do now. Treatment does work, if given the chance, both for the individual receiving it and the community they belong to. Please allow it to work for Morgan.

    Thank you for your consideration.

    Sincerely,
    XXX XXXXXXX"

  4. Scout – it's fabulous. You are a wonderful advocate and example of how mental illness should be diagnosed and treated – as an illness that can be diagnosed and managed. Thank you.

Leave a Response